Archive for the ‘Social Media’ Category

Sample Social Media Responsibility Hierarchy

July 13, 2010

We often get asked by our clients how they should go about delegating time, manpower and resources to managing a site using new media / social media. This sample chart illustrates how an organization can designate responsibility and the time that each resource should spend maintaining. Keep in mind this chart is an example of a specific organization. Each organization should create their own flowchart for accountability based on their available resources. One thing is for sure though, time and responsibility must be delegated.

PDF Download: Sample Social Media Management protocol

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Is social media a fad?

March 4, 2010

Why should you take social media seriously? – Why should you take it more seriously then your traditional marketing? – How do we know social media not a fad?

The below video sums it up.

Even Ad Age Says Traditional Marketing Is Dying

April 8, 2009

We believe that, while some traditional media has its place, social media and the web is the best way to reach many demographics.

But it’s not as simple as just buying online ads or setting up a Facebook organization page. You have be genuine and authentic – and have something original to say. The good news is that, if you have the goods (i.e you know what you’re talking about or have a really good product or service), you stand a good chance at success because Earned Media is overtaking Paid Media in terms of impact.

Check out this article from Ad Age that helps prove that point.

So What Is This Social Media Stuff Anyway?

March 18, 2009

A lot of people talk about Social Media (or Web 2.0) – but not everyone knows exactly what it really means.

That’s okay. Like your mom told you when you were 13, it’s okay to be curious.

Web 1.0 was the first decade of the web, where the internet was a place to look and read. The information flowed one way: from a website to the user. Think of it like reading a brochure that happened to be online.

Social Media is a completely different beast. Over the last half-decade, the internet has changed from a one-way conversation to an active conversation between multiple parties.

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Blogs. e-Newsletters. Twitter. Facebook. Myspace. LinkedIn. Wikipedia. They’re all ways for anyone and everyone to take AND contribute information.

Since Social Media is where your customers, clients and donors are spending their time and money, it’s smart business to get in on that conversation with Permission Marketing.

It takes time and effort. Web 2.0 and Social Media tools require fresh, relevant and changing content all the time. But it’s worth it to stay connected with your market.

Twitter Analysis of Budweiser vs. Magic Hat

February 25, 2009

It’s interesting to see how companies of various sizes are handling Social Media and e-Marketing as part of their Brand Management strategies.

One small part of this that I always pay attention to is how they react – or don’t react – to Twitter activity about them. (If you’re not familiar with Twitter, click here or here.)

For example….

I like to homebrew beer and also try to taste as many different microbrews from small breweries around the country. (From our neck of the woods, I’m a fan of Saranac, Ithaca, and Ommegang, among others).

While I usually stick to the smaller guys, I’ve been curious for the last few months hearing Budweiser’s endless plugs for its new American Ale on NPR and This American Life. So I finally picked up some at the Giant by my house over the weekend. For the record, I enjoyed it – though for my follow-up beverage, I switched over the Magic Hat‘s Roxy Roll seasonal brew, which is a personal favorite.

Budweiser may have the fancy packaging and Super Bowl ads, but Magic Hat leads a Tribe.

Budweiser may have the fancy packaging and Super Bowl ads,but Magic Hat leads a Tribe.

Then I posted my comments about Budweiser and Magic Hat on Twitter.

When I checked in a day or two later to see if I had any new Twitter Followers, I was excited to see that Magic Hat was following me. They earned an even more loyal fan. Seth Godin would say I’m in their Tribe now.

I heard nothing from Budweiser. Now, I’m still impressed that their new beer wasn’t bad. But they missed an opportunity to permission market to me.

The point? Sometimes small, nimble, authentic companies do a better job of working new Social Media and e-Marketing tools than giant corporations that spend literally hundreds of millions of dollars every year on marketing. And, in today’s marketplace, that’s a smarter and wiser investment of time and resources.

The Slow Death of Traditional Media

January 8, 2009

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Have you advertised on TV, on the radio or in a print newspaper lately? You probably found that prices are skyrocketing and effectiveness is plummeting.

Why? Same reason as most major social shifts in the history of mankind: technology. Tivo and DVRs are devaluing traditional television ads. iPods and satellite radio are keeping people from listenting to the radio. And ask anyone you know under the age of 30 when they last picked up the print version of a newspaper.

Old school interruption advertising isn’t the same “that’s where the eyeballs are” media buy it was years ago.

So what’s a business or not-for-profit to do to keep their customers or clients engaged – and to get new prospects to become customers?

Learn as much as you can about e-Marketing. Social media, Business blogs, e-Newsletters, Microblogging (like Twitter) and Podcasts are where your customers, clients and donors are moving. So, in order to keep at the top of their minds, you need to move there, too.

Advertising and Social Media

December 18, 2008
the Brooklyn Museum's ArtShare application on Facebook allows users to share art and connect with museums.

the Brooklyn Museum's ArtShare application on Facebook allows users to share art and connect with museums.

Over the weekend, the New York Times ran a good article about the current state of advertising on social media sites. The upshot: the average person goes to a social media site to be social, not to consume advertising or befriend laundry detergent.

I think one thing that is frustrating traditional “advertisers” is the fact that social media works much more on the old PR model, and that marketing/advertising/PR are becoming less and less distinct disciplines in this environment.

For real though – who is going to be an active contributor to Tide’s corporate page? Who has the time? The challenge for brands is being creative and delivering – yes, I’m going to use those two magic words again – valuable content. Apparently that doesn’t include a gallery of “America’s Favorite Stains.”(ps it’s a work-safe link.)

On the other hand, it will take a while, but behavior on Facebook will likely include shopping one day. I came very close to shopping at the Met’s store for a Christmas present because of an ad on Fb. I clicked through to the site and browsed. For me, that’s as much of a conversion as they’ll ever get because I am, at the end of the day, very cheap. I’ll go back after the holidays and buy ornaments for gifts for next year. I’m in that, much reviled-by-my-own-profession demographic.

And while Tide’s stain-o-rama page has fewer than 500 fans, the Met’s page? More than 35,000, including me. And I get valuable information about events and exhibits right there in my notifications, without having to search it out.

And if you want to talk about being really valuable to your constituents, look at the Brooklyn Museum’s ArtShare application, which allows people and museums who are passionate about art to share it on Facebook. It’s that kind of thinking that will win you a Groundswell Award, as well as distinction as an innovator in your field and exposure to an audience that might never have heard of you otherwise.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to share some Hopper with friends.